Magic the Gathering Card Recognition

This weekend I took a bit of time to read up on OpenCV (Open Source Computer Vision Library), I wanted to capture images of Magic the Gathering cards, then identify them using a Python library called ImageHash.

Below is a demonstration of what I was able to accomplish in about 2 days of research and hacking:

I’ll try and break down the steps and image manipulation functions I used to achieve this.

1. Capturing Stream from Webcam

Capturing the video stream, then displaying it on screen, is quite simple.  What I did was create an endless loop where I capture a single frame, then display that frame. This loop will complete when the q key is pressed.

import cv2

cap = cv2.VideoCapture(0)

while True:
    ret, frame = cap.read()

    cv2.imshow('frame', frame)

    if cv2.waitKey(1) == ord('q'):
        break

cap.release()
cv2.destroyAllWindows()

For demonstration I’m going to show you a snapshot of the stream through this process:

View post on imgur.com

2. Convert Frame to Grayscale

It is common to convert your image to grayscale, this helps us threshold and identify our contours in later steps:

gray = cv2.cvtColor(frame, cv2.COLOR_BGR2GRAY)

View post on imgur.com

3. Convert Frame to Grayscale

A Threshold allows us to convert our images to absolute black, or absolute white. Here, I’m converting any pixel at color 130 or higher to color 255:

_, thresh = cv2.threshold(gray, 130, 255, cv2.THRESH_BINARY)

View post on imgur.com

4. Find all Contours of Threshold Image

Using my threshold frame, we can find all contours:

_, contours, _ = cv2.findContours(thresh,cv2.RETR_TREE, cv2.CHAIN_APPROX_SIMPLE)

sorted_contours = sorted([ (cv2.contourArea(i), i) for i in contours ], key=lambda a:a[0], reverse=True)

for _, contour in sorted_contours:
    cv2.drawContours(frame, [contour], -1, (0, 255, 0), 2)

This ends up looking something like this:

View post on imgur.com

5. Find card contour

Here is where I got lazy and decided to just hack it together.

If you notice in the above image, there is a contour for the entire frame and the next largest contour is our card’s edges. I decided for the time being to hard code our card contour as the 2nd largest contour:

_, card_contour = sorted_contours[1]
cv2.drawContours(frame, [card_contour], -1, (0, 255, 0), 2)

View post on imgur.com

6. Drawing Card Corner Points

Next I pass our card_contour into opencv’s minAreaRect function, this gives us 4 points, one for each corner:

rect = cv2.minAreaRect(card_contour)
points = cv2.boxPoints(rect)
points = np.int0(points)

for point in points:
    cv2.circle(frame, tuple(point), 10, (0,255,0), -1)

View post on imgur.com

7. Identify Corners and Warp Image

This part was a little challenging, but I found an excellent explanation by Adrian over at pyimagesearch.com.

Basically, he takes advantage of numpy and how opencv provides box points in row / columns.

# create a min area rectangle from our contour
_rect = cv2.minAreaRect(card_contour)
box = cv2.boxPoints(_rect)
box = np.int0(box)

# create empty initialized rectangle
rect = np.zeros((4, 2), dtype = "float32")

# get top left and bottom right points
s = box.sum(axis = 1)
rect[0] = box[np.argmin(s)]
rect[2] = box[np.argmax(s)]

# get top right and bottom left points
diff = np.diff(box, axis = 1)
rect[1] = box[np.argmin(diff)]
rect[3] = box[np.argmax(diff)]

(tl, tr, br, bl) = rect

widthA = np.sqrt(((br[0] - bl[0]) ** 2) + ((br[1] - bl[1]) ** 2))
widthB = np.sqrt(((tr[0] - tl[0]) ** 2) + ((tr[1] - tl[1]) ** 2))
maxWidth = max(int(widthA), int(widthB))

heightA = np.sqrt(((tr[0] - br[0]) ** 2) + ((tr[1] - br[1]) ** 2))
heightB = np.sqrt(((tl[0] - bl[0]) ** 2) + ((tl[1] - bl[1]) ** 2))
maxHeight = max(int(heightA), int(heightB))

dst = np.array([
    [0, 0],
    [maxWidth - 1, 0],
    [maxWidth - 1, maxHeight - 1],
    [0, maxHeight - 1]], dtype = "float32")

M = cv2.getPerspectiveTransform(rect, dst)
warped = cv2.warpPerspective(frame, M, (maxWidth, maxHeight))

The warped frame came out looking as follows:

View post on imgur.com

7. Hash Image and Compare

First off, this solution will not scale! Be forewarned.

I grabbed 4 Magic cards from my collection, then grabbed an official image from the Gatherer website and stuck it in a directory.

After that, I hashed my warped image, then iterated over each official image comparing hashes:

from PIL import Image, ImageFilter
from glob import glob
import imagehash

# hash our warped image
hash = imagehash.average_hash(Image.fromarray(warped))

# loop over all official images
for orig in glob('orig/*.jpeg'):

    # grayscale, resize, and blur original image
    orig_image = Image.open(orig).convert('LA')
    orig_image.resize((maxWidth, maxHeight))
    orig_image.filter(ImageFilter.BLUR)

    # hash original and get hash
    orig_hash = imagehash.average_hash(orig_image)
    score = hash - orig_hash

    print('Comparing image to {}, score {}'.format(
        orig, score
    ))
print('-' * 50)

And that is it, the Goldenglow Moth card resulted in the following print:

Comparing image to orig/doom_blade.jpeg, score 25
Comparing image to orig/forst_breath.jpeg, score 26
Comparing image to orig/goldenglow_moth.jpeg, score 7
Comparing image to orig/kessig_wolf.jpeg, score 13
--------------------------------------------------

4 thoughts on “Magic the Gathering Card Recognition

  1. Jeff

    since you grayscaled the orignal images, should the warped image be grayscaled too?

  2. matt

    How are you even getting the snapshots from the video? After step 1, I’m not sure where does gray = cv2.cvtColor(frame, cv2.COLOR_BGR2GRAY) go, I think we missed a step. Thanks for this by the way.

    • nessy

      Well in part #1 I’m using cv2’s VideoCapture method in a infinite loop to demonstrate streaming from a webcam, on each iteration I save a single snapshot (or picture) from the webcam stream as a variable named frame:

      cap = cv2.VideoCapture(0)
      
      while True:
          ret, frame = cap.read()
          cv2.imshow('frame', frame)
      

      In the following steps it is assume the loop was exited, and we work directory with the frame (our single image from webcam).

      I hope this helped.

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